5 principles of human-friendly facades

In cities, thousands of people walk around facades of many buildings daily. How we design them has a profound effect on human lives.

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Fractals have been used in architecture for thousands of years and reflect the basic principles of natural beauty. Source: Unsplash / Mohamad Mahdi Abbasi

1. Symmetry

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Symmetry can be applied in architecture at both the global and the local level. Local symmetry in smaller scale is more important (Dunajská 38 in Bratislava). Source: Michal Matlon

2. Natural materials, colors and textures

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The facade of Blumental project allows the eye to pause on a variety of tiles with a natural stone decor. The tiling looks solid and soothing even at the ground floor level. Source: Michal Matlon
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Nová Mýtna combines a chaotic arrangement of windows with a smooth, one-color facade without texture or natural materials. Source: Michal Matlon
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The facade of a residential building on Račianská 20/A is monotonous and minimalist, but makes a good impression thanks to a rough plaster. Source: Michal Matlon

3. Natural patterns

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The architecture of Sant Pau hospital in Barcelona is full of natural patterns, shapes and ornaments. Source: Michal Matlon
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The hospital, which grew up next to the original Sant Pau in Barcelona in 2009, is almost indistinguishable from a logistics center. Its facade is confusing for our brain because it does not contain enough naturally organized information. Photo: santpau.es

4. Organized complexity and fractals

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The traditional Amsterdam development is an excellent example of organized complexity. The height and width of the buildings are almost identical, the human scale is preserved, but the individual buildings have the opportunity for self-expression. Source: Unsplash / Isabella Jusková

5. Human scale and detail

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The presence of small details is important for the human brain. The picture shows a new Berlin building Rosengärten from 2013. Source: Patzschke & Partner Architekten

Psychology of architecture and workplaces. https://www.michalmatlon.com/

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